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Career Exploration



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Grade Level Information

Career Exploration


High school is a great time to start exploring what you are passionate about and how you would like to put that passion into action with your future career. Del Oro students have many opportunities to identify what their interests and abilities are through athletics, clubs, leadership in the school and out in the community. Deciding on your future career is not a quick thoughtless decision, in the College and Career Center we will assist you in the steps that are necessary when exploring career and college options. The CCC is in the process of moving. In the meantime, please contact Mrs. Fessenden at bfessenden@puhsd.k12.ca.us with any questions.


Personality Assessments:

It can be interesting to see the results of these types of assessments and then look for related careers as a starting point for career and college exploration.


DISC Personality Assessment

This free DISC personality test lets you determine your DISC type and personality profile quickly. Find out how the DISC factors, Dominance, Influence, Steadiness and Compliance predict your behavior towards others and the everyday things you do.


DISC test dimensions

This online DISC assessment is designed to test personality by calculating your personal DISC profile based on your everyday typical behavior. Simply fill out the inventory like you would with other online personality tests. It's quick and without any obligations. The DISC test is, together with the Jung test and Big Five personality test, one of the most well known personality tests worldwide.


In the detailed report you will find information regarding your DISC type and a concise textual characterization of your personality profile. 


16 Personalities Personality Test based on Myers Briggs Test

Identifies personality types based on the acronyms of Myers-Briggs based on Jungian concepts such as cognitive functions, or their prioritization. Jungian concepts are very difficult to measure and validate scientifically, so they’ve instead chosen to rework and rebalance the dimensions of personality called the Big Five personality traits, a model that dominates modern psychological and social research. The personality types are based on five independent spectrums, with all letters in the type code (e.g. INFJ-A) referring to one of the two sides of the corresponding spectrum. You can see where you fall on each scale by completing our free personality assessment, NERIS Type Explorer®. This approach has them to achieve high test accuracy while also retaining the ability to define and describe distinct personality types.


Holland Code (RIASEC) Test

The Holland Code (RIASEC) refers to both career theory and professional choice based on personality types. It was created by a well-known American scientist, psychologist, John L. Holland. RIASEC codes are based on six personality types: Realistic, Investigative, Artistic, Social, Enterprising, or Conventional. A person’s scores in these six areas suggest which occupations might best suit their personalities.  A scientist from the State University of Pennsylvania suggested an alternative way to categorize six types - ancient social roles: (Realistic) hunters, (Inquisitive) shamans, (Artistic) artisans, (Social) healers, (Initiative) leaders, and (Usual) lore keepers. You can easily identify your interests and what you like to do with the help of this test without too much difficulty. Three types of RIASEC with the highest combined points means your three-letter Holland summary code. It is the most concise and understandable way to tell about your interests' combination. Usually, they are the result of your previous life experience. To take the Holland Code career assessment, mark your interest in each shown activity. Do not worry about whether you have the skills or training to do an activity, or how much money you might make; just think about whether you would enjoy doing it or not. 


These Websites can be used for more college and career exploration, learning and matching your personality type to careers, etc.

                Career Exploration Activities
                        Do What You Are Activity - survey that produces a report with your Myers Briggs personality type and    
                             suggested careers based on those results.

                             Interest Profiler - survey on interests that results in a list of possible careers. You'll be able to compare them
                             and also find related majors and colleges that offer that major.


Career Planning:

The Career Planning Process by thebalancecareers is a website with a series of great articles related to career planning.


Search Engines:

  • CareerOneStop is your source for career exploration, training and jobs, sponsored by the US Department of Labor. Explore careers, including videos of hundreds of careers by industry, some in Spanish. Also includes a Local Training Finder, includes types of training, including certifications, apprenticeships, internships, and college. Job search by title and zip code. Resume and cover letter help too.

  • O*NET Interest Profiler is a helpful site that will help you find what your career interests are and what your Holland code is (RIASEC), which lists in order what your personality traits are based on your answers. O*net uses the Holland's code to match you to career industries and specific careers for further exploration.

  • Big Future is another online tool that can assist with discovering career options and associated college majors.

Connect with Others

Step away from the computer and reach out to professionals in the career of interest. Set up an informational interview, job shadow, Take a Dual Enrollment or Sierra College course, apply for an internship, come to career presentations on campus.

Thoughtful Tips

  • Stay open-minded; resist the expectation that you should have a career well planned out already. You have all of high school, college and beyond to decide what career is best for you. 

  • Don't be afraid of uncertainty and failure. Remember if something doesn't work out at least you have gained new knowledge and self awareness.

  • Gather information and advice from others. Listening to others perspectives is beneficial in decision making, filter through the information as it relates to what is important to you, not what you think you should do.

Helpful Links

Created by the Department of Labor, these sites below are used to research careers, wages, employment outlook statistics, and more across the United States.
  • O*NET

  • Occupational Outlook Handbook

  • Jobs For Teens - this site focuses specifically on helping teenagers find jobs and it's 100% free to use. It has very useful information including work permit requirements, labor laws, jobs for teens by city/state, job ideas, jobs by age, and more.